IAC Vein Center - Press & Media

The following are recent clips from various media pertaining to IAC.

Venous Center Accreditation
A Pathway to Improved Quality Care

SEPTEMBER 2015 | If one includes the entire spectrum of venous disease, from telangiectasias and reticular veins to open leg ulcerations, there are approximately 25 million people in the United States who are affected.1 More than 500,000 patients have active venous ulcers, with approximately 1% of all adults estimated to develop
a leg ulcer at some point in their lives (Figure 1).2 This level of disease prevalence is associated with a sig-nificant economic burden on the health care system, which is thought to be between $1.5 to $3 billion annually for ulcer care alone.3 Particularly with the advent of less-invasive percutaneous methods for the treatment of venous insufficiency, the number of procedures performed has skyrocketed and has become a focus of concern for both payers and the public.4
Source: Endovascular Today
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Standardization Welcome in the Office-Based Setting
Massachusetts Becomes First State to Require IAC Vein Center Accreditation

MAY 2015 | Similar themes, concerns and hopes were shared by speakers during the Venous Governance session on Thursday afternoon. At the top of the list: the hot topics of accreditation and standardization, coupled with looming health care changes and their future impact on office-based vein practices.
Source: International Vein Congress Daily News
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Diagnosis Starts with the Basics: Mapping, Drawing, Ultrasounds

MAY 2015 | Visual examination, thorough documentation and ultrasound proficiency were topics covered by speakers on Thursday morning. Jan Sloves, RVT, RCS, FASE, looked at the role that venous duplex mapping plays in patient documentation. He stressed the need for this to be done correctly — and identified four components that make up the venous map: protocol, technique, anatomy and documentation.
Source: International Vein Congress Daily News
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Today's Presenters to Discuss Need for Accreditation, Standardization

APRIL 2015 | Lowell Kabnick, MD, RPhS, FACS, will moderate today's session on venous governance, which begins at 4 p.m. The session will include discussions on the importance of developing venous accreditation as well as a need to develop strategies for a national determination policy that simplifies physician reimbursement, and brings multiple disciplines together in a common-practices understanding.
Source: International Vein Congress Daily News
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IAC Vein Center Accreditation: How we got here, where we are now, and goals for the future

APRIL 2014 | Uniting the distinctive combination of evidence-based medicine with the consensus of expert opinion among a multitude of vein specialists, including interventionists, general and vascular surgeons, dermatologists, phlebologists, and technologists, the new Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) Vein Center accreditation division offers a process by which centers that perform evaluation and management of superficial venous disorders can voluntarily demonstrate their commitment to quality patient care.
Source: Endovascular Today
By Lowell S. Kabnick, MD, RPhS, FACS, FACPh, and Alan M. Dietzek, MD, RPVI, FACS
Neil Khilnani, MD

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Vein Center Accreditation: A Process to Demonstrate a Commitment to Quality Vein Care

MARCH 2014 | The care of venous disorders of the lower extremities has changed significantly in the last 25 years. Treatment for nearly all chronic superficial and a growing fraction of deep venous disease now involves minimally invasive procedures that can be done with no sedation and immediate ambulation. This has been a tremendous improvement for patients and transformative for the care they can now receive. Many patients who were reluctant to undergo treatment in the past are now benefitting from these simpler, more targeted and easier to tolerate treatments performed in less intimidating and more efficient environments.
Source: Vein Magazine - Winter 2014
Neil Khilnani, MD

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Imaging Economics - Regulatory Watch
CMS says manufacturer maintenance recommendations continue to rule.

FEBRUARY 2014 | Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considered relaxing its December 2011 directive that specifies the methods and frequency with which hospital equipment must be maintained in order to qualify for reimbursement. While some stakeholders viewed the prospect as a rational adjustment for efficiency, others saw it as an ill-advised compromise of patient safety. Now with its late-breaking December 2013 decision, CMS appears to have struck a middle course: Hospitals may introduce alternative equipment maintenance frequency or methods, but not in the case of imaging equipment. The latter must continue to adhere to manufacturer maintenance recommendations.
Source: Imaging Economics, January/February 2014 Issue
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Demystifying Imaging Laboratory Accreditation

FEBRUARY 2014 | It is self-evident that patients expect high quality of the services they receive. For this reason, procedural-based medical (therapeutic) services have long been subject to some form of quality assessment. In the same vein, it is also appropriate
that similar expectations have recently come about for cardiovascular (CV) imaging (diagnostic) services. In this report, we provide the background of CV laboratory accreditation and explore what the future holds in assessing quality in CV imaging.
Source: JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014
Geoffrey A. Rose, MD, Neil J. Weissman, MD

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Imaging Economics - Regulatory Watch
CMS says manufacturer maintenance recommendations continue to rule.

FEBRUARY 2014 | Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considered relaxing its December 2011 directive that specifies the methods and frequency with which hospital equipment must be maintained in order to qualify for reimbursement. While some stakeholders viewed the prospect as a rational adjustment for efficiency, others saw it as an ill-advised compromise of patient safety. Now with its late-breaking December 2013 decision, CMS appears to have struck a middle course: Hospitals may introduce alternative equipment maintenance frequency or methods, but not in the case of imaging equipment. The latter must continue to adhere to manufacturer maintenance recommendations.
Source: Imaging Economics, January/February 2014 Issue
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IAC Vein Center Division for Standardization and Improvement of Care Delivery

SEPTEMBER 2013 | Lowell Kabnick, MD, RPhS, FACS, FACPh, Director of NYU Vein Center, has been elected as President of the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) Vein Center Division for the standardization of and improvement of care delivery for patients suffering from venous diseases. In this role, he will be leading a team to develop accreditation standards for facilities involved in the diagnosis and treatment of venous disease, including for varicose veins and deep venous disease. The need for accreditation of facilities beyond the accreditation for physicians has arisen due to the expansion of treating physicians beyond the traditional Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists to specialists including: Cardiologists, Dermatologists, Obstetricians/Gynecologists, and other specialists with a variety of backgrounds (surgical and non-surgical) and disparate training (weekend courses to fellowships). Accrediting facilities that house vein treatments will help ensure standards of care are defined and met, regardless of specialty. Read more»
Source: lowellkabnickmd.com